Archives

Resource Library

National Vital Statistics Report Birth: Preliminary Report 2014

Author: ElleAnalise

Share

DescriptionPreviewVersions
nvsrbirthpreliminarydata2014.pdf

This report presents preliminary 2014 data on U.S. births. Births are shown by age, live-birth order, race, and Hispanic origin of mother. Data on marital status, cesarean delivery, preterm births, and low birthweight are also presented.

 

Selected Highlights:

  • The preliminary birth rate for teenagers in 2014 was 24.2 births per 1,000 women aged 15–19—yet another historic low for the nation. The rate was down 9% from 2013 (26.5) and has declined more than 7% annually since 2007.
  • In 2014, the overall cesarean delivery rate was 32.2%, a 2% decline from 32.7% in 2013. After peaking in 2009 at 32.9%, the rate remained stable for 2010–2012. The 2014 preliminary rate is the lowest since 2007.
  • The 2014 preterm birth rate (based on the obstetric estimate of gestation, as described in the Introduction) was 9.57%, down slightly from 9.62% in 2013. Preterm birth rates declined in 44 states and the District of Columbia from 2007 to 2014; the rates for 6 states (Hawaii, Iowa, Kansas,Montana, Nebraska, and North Dakota) did not change significantly over this period.
  • The 2014 U.S. low birthweight (LBW) rate was 8.00%, essentially unchanged from 2013 (8.02%).

 

Resource Library

National Vital Statistics Report Birth: Final Report 2013

Author: ElleAnalise

Share

DescriptionPreviewVersions
nvsrbirthfinaldatafor2013.pdf

This report presents detailed data on numbers and characteristics of births in 2013, birth and fertility rates, maternal demographic and health characteristics, place of and attendant at birth, and infant health characteristics. Selected Hightlights:

  • The birth rate for teenagers aged 15–19 declined 10% in 2013 from 2012, to 26.5 births per 1,000 teenagers aged 15–19, another historic low for the nation; rates declined for teenagers in nearly all race and Hispanic origin groups
  • The cesarean delivery rate, which had been stable at 32.8% for 2010–2012, declined to 32.7% of all U.S. births in 2013. Declines in cesarean deliveries were seen at 38, 40, and 41 completed weeks of gestation in 2013 from 2012
  • The preterm birth rate (under 37 weeks) declined again in 2013, to 11.39%. This rate has been dropping steadily since 2006, for a total decline of 11%. Preterm births in 2013 were down from2012 for non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic births
  • The 2013 rate of low birthweight (less than 2,500 grams) was 8.02%, essentially unchanged from 2012 but 3% lower than the 2006 high (8.26%)

Resource Library

Maternal positions and mobility during first stage labour - A Cochrane Review

Author: ElleAnalise

Share

DescriptionPreviewVersions
lawrence_et_al-2013-the_cochrane_birthpositions.pdf

It is more common for women in the developed world, and those in low-income countries giving birth in health facilities, to labour in bed. There is no evidence that this is associated with any advantage for women or babies, although it may be more convenient for staff. Observational studies have suggested that if women lie on their backs during labour this may have adverse effects on uterine contractions and impede progress in labour.

Resource Library

Avoid giving birth on your back - Journal of Perinatal Education

Author: ElleAnalise

Share

DescriptionPreviewVersions
avoidgivingbirthonyourback.pdf

Women in the United States are still giving birth in the supine position and are restricted in how long they can push and encouraged to push forcefully by their caregivers. Research does not support these activities. There is discussion about current research and suggestions on how to improve the quality of the birth experience. This article is an updated evidence-based review of the “Lamaze International Care Practices That Promote Normal Birth, Care Practice #5: Spontaneous Pushing in Upright or Gravity-Neutral Positions,” published in The Journal of Perinatal Education, 16(3), 2007.

Resource Library

Walk, Move Around, and Change Positions Throughout Labor - The Journal of Perinatal Education

Author: ElleAnalise

Share

DescriptionPreviewVersions
movingaroundduringpregnancy.pdf

In the United States, obstetric care is intervention intensive, resulting in 1 in 3 women undergoing cesarean surgery wherein mobility is treated as an intervention rather than supporting the natural physiologic process for optimal birth. Women who use upright positions and are mobile during labor have shorter labors, receive less intervention, report less severe pain, and describe more satisfaction with their childbirth experience than women in recumbent positions. This article is an updated evidence-based review of the “Lamaze International Care Practices That Promote Normal Birth, Care Practice #2: Freedom of Movement Throughout Labor,” published in The Journal of Perinatal Education, 16(3), 2007.

Resource Library

Northern Virginia Cesarean Section Rates

Author: ElleAnalise

Share

DescriptionPreviewVersions

Two Virginia hospitals have some of the highest rates for C-section deliveries for low-risk pregnancies in the country. Your birth story is yours to hold for forever, be knowledgeable about where you choose to give birth. Unnecessary interventions in labor and birth can change your life forever. Take Back Your Story! Knowledge is Power!!

Resource Library

Commonwealth of Virginia Low-Birth Rate Statistical Data 2014

Author: ElleAnalise

Share

DescriptionPreviewVersions
lwbirths14.pdf

The Healthy People 2020 objective is to have a low birth rate (under 2,500 g) of no more than 7.8% of live births. For 2013, the March of Dimes reported that the  US did not meet this goal having a low birth rate of 8%.  In accordance with the Virginia Department of Health statistical data for 2014 the Commonwealth of Virginia had a low birth rate of 7.9% of total births. Planning district 8 inclusive of Arlington County, Fairfax County, Loudoun County, Prince William County, Alexandria City, Fairfax City, Falls Church City, Mananas City, and Mananas Park City had a 6.9% low birth rate. Of these numbers African Americans have the highest percentage of low birth weight for the Commonwealth of Virginia as a whole and within planning district 8.

Resource Library

Virginia Teenage Pregnancy Rates 2013

Author: ElleAnalise

Share

DescriptionPreviewVersions
teenpregage13.pdf

In accordance with the Office of Adolescent Health, Virginia ranked 40 out of 51 (50 states & the District of Columbia) concerning 2013 teen birth rates among young ladies aged 15-19 (1 being the highest rate and 51 representing the lowest rate). This is an improvement from 2010 when Virginia ranked 36. In comparison to the US who had a rate of 26.5 per 1,000 births, Virginia had a rate of 20.1 per 1,000 births for young ladies aged 15-19 with the highest rate between 18-19 years old. In comparison to the US who had a rate of 17% repeat birth in 2013, Virginia had a repeat birth percentage of 14. In accordance with statistical data from the Virginia Department of Health, planning District 8 which is inclusive of Arlington County, Fairfax County, Loudoun County, Prince William County, Alexandria City, Fairfax City, Falls Church City, Mananas City and Mananas Park had 1,2010 teenage pregnancies in 2013 at a rate of 8.2 per 1,000 young ladies. Mananas City, Alexandria City, and Falls Church City had the highest rates at 35.5, 24.8, and 19.9 per 1,000 young ladies respectively. Planning District 8 had the 3rd highest number of pregnancies out of all of the planning districts in Virginia. Of the 1,210 pregnancies 830 resulted in live births, 360 resulted in induced termination, and 20 resulted in natural fetal death.

Resource Library

Virginia Premature Birth Report Card 2015

Author: ElleAnalise

Share

DescriptionPreviewVersions
premature-birth-report-card-virginia2015.pdf

Great news The Commonwealth of Virginia received a B on their March of Dimes report card for preterm birth!  Grade ranges were established in 2015 based on final 2014 state and District of Columbia preterm birth rates away from the March of Dimes goal of 8.1% by 2020. The March of Dimes Prematurity Campaign aims to reduce preterm birth rates across the United States. A grade of a B is a reflection of a preterm birth rate of 8.2% to 9.2%.Alexandria and Arlington VA showed a decrease in premature birth rate from the 2013 state rate of 9.4%.

The March of Dimes also ranks states based on a disparity index, this provides a measure of differences in preterm birth rates across racial/ethnic groups within a geographic area. Virginia received a disparity index of 16 and is ranked number 6 out of 50 with 1 being the lowest disparity index. The percentage of live births that are preterm are as follows for identified groups: African American – 12.4%; Caucasians & Asians – 8.7%; and Hispanic 8.6%.